Between Memory and Loci

Between Memory and Loci – Solo Exhibition of Angelia Ford

These works explore the dramatic renovation that human memory performs upon history – transforming past events into personal narratives.

Through encaustic works on paper and wood, book making and printmaking, Ford creates a passageway that reveals and solidifies her memories and recollections during various points in her life.  Memory is defined as a reflection of the past, a sum total of what is remembered.  These memories give us the ability to grow and adapt, to build relationships, and to even end relationships.

The word Loci translates to “places” in Latin.  The Method of Loci is a mnemonic device that was adopted by the Ancient Roman and Greeks in their rhetorical treatises.  It is a method of memory enhancement that uses visualization to organize and recall information.

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Tres Custodes (Three Guardians); Encaustic and Oil on Wood Panel; 12×16”;

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Obligo (Swathe); Encaustic, Oil, and Thread on Wood Panel; 12×16”

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Detrudo (Dispossess); Encaustic, Oil, and Silver Leaf on Wood Panel; 12×16”

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Effluo (Seep); Encaustic and Oil on Wood Panel; 12×16”

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Homagium (Homage); Encaustic, Graphite, and Oil on Wood Panel

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Chaos Ad Nihilum (Chaos to Nothingness); Encaustic and Oil on Wood Panel; 12×16”

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Natura Spiritus (Nature Spirit); Encaustic and Oil on Wood Panel; 12×16”

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Prolapsio (Descension); Encaustic, Oil, and hand-made Gampi paper on Wood Panel; 12×16”

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Ostium (Entrance); Encaustic and Oil on Wood Panel; 12×16”

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Nidum (Nesting); Encaustic, Oil, and twigs on Wood Panel; 12×16”

Noses Never Stop Growing,  By Angelia Ford. All rights reserved.

Noses Never Stop Growing, +32.77580-96.79035

The series of drawings titled “Creating Visibility for the Invisible” explores the dynamics ofhomelessness, and reveals the paths and circumstances that led to their subjects’ displacement. The drawings reflect upon the homeless individuals’ isolation, while examining the common misconceptions to focus on the long-standing chasm between the homeless and their surrounding communities.I talk to each individual for three to four hours in an effort to understand the reasons they became homeless. As references for my drawings, I take between fifteen to twenty photographs. The latitude and longitude of the location where I spoke to them is added to the drawing as a geographical point for the viewer. This is their home.

My work reveals the barriers that have been created by stereotypes, and considers the homeless population from a different perspective. In re-evaluating their plight through art, I recognize the homeless and nurture the hope that they will no longer be ignored. Instead, they are seen as people who are doing the best they can to survive. They are people who have a story, if only we would take time to listen.